Skip to the content

The Review of the Pre-Raphaelite Society, Volumes XVI–XVIII

<< back to volumes XIII–XV | forward to volumes XIX–XXI >>

Autumn 2010 cover

Vol. XVIII, No. 3, Autumn 2010:

  1. “Lady with a Dove” by Charles Brett.
  2. “Book Review Painting the Sacred in the Age of Romanticism by Cordula Grewe” by Simon Poë.
  3. John Pickard Essay Prize Announcement.
  4. “John White Alexander’s Isabella and the Pot of Basil” by Liana Cheney.
  5. “Book Review The Death of King Arthur by Peter Ackroyd” by Simon Poë.
  6. “Book Review Ruskin on Venice by Robert Hewison” by Lucy Clark.
  7. “Ruskin’s Proserpina” by Cristina Pascu-Tulbure.
  8. “Speaking up for Charles Allston Collins” by Angela Richardson.
  9. “Book Review Artistic Circles: Design & Decoration in the Aesthetic Movement by Charlotte Gere” by Charlotte Clark.
  10. “Exhibition Review: The Pre‑Raphaelites and Italy” by Eleanor Beyer.

Summer 2010 cover

Vol. XVIII, No. 2, Summer 2010:

  1. “Affinity: Sarah Waters and Dante Gabriel Rossetti” by Simon Cooke
  2. “Book Review The Pre‑Raphaelite Trail in Kent  by Peter Wise” by Aileen Naylor
  3. “Exhibition Reviews: Burne‑Jones in Canada and Tiffany Glass by Simon Poë
  4. Runner Up Essay for the John Pickard Essay Prize, 2009 “Joseph Southall: A True Pre-Raphaelite?“ by Hannah Carroll
  5. “Book Review The Worlds of John Ruskin by Kevin Jackson” by Margaret English
  6. “Book Review The Crimson Bed by Loretta Proctor” by Serena Trowbridge
  7. “Three Quartets: the Rossettis, the Mendelssohns and the Brontës” by Ian Emberson
  8. “Book Review Millais: A sketch by M.H. Spielmann” by Margaret Hale
  9. “Book Review Representations of Hair in Victorian Literature and Culture by Galia Ofek” by Christina Pascu-Tulbure
  10. “Exhibition Review: Objects of Affection: Pre‑Raphaelite Portraits by John Brett  by Simon Poë
  11. “A Visit to the Restored Leighton House” by Serena Trowbridge

Spring 2010 cover

Vol. XVIII, No. 1, Spring 2010:

  1. “Brett and Birmingham” by Professor Ann Sumner
  2. “Book Review A History of Kelmscott House by Helen Elletson” by Barry Johnson
  3. Winning Essay for the John Pickard Essay Prize, 2009 “The Pre‑Raphaelite Lovejoy: Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Charles Augustus Howell, the eponymous ‘dodgy dealer’ ” by Anne Anderson
  4. “Exhibition Review Burne-Jones in Stuttgart” by Ian Macsporran
  5. “Book Review Frederic, Lord Leighton, 1830-1896: Painter and Sculptor of the Victorian Age by Michael Buhrs and Margot Th Brandlhuber” by Simon Poë
  6. “Book Review Victorian Photography, Painting and Poetry by Lindsay Smith” by Margaret English
  7. “Book Review Illustrating Camelot by Barbara Tepack Lupack” by Cristina Pascu-Tulbure
  8. “Christina Rossetti and the Victorian Aesthetic Market Place” by Sharon Worley
  9. “Review Essay Desperate Romantics on TV” by Amelia Yeates

Autumn 2009 cover

Vol. XVII, No. 3, Autumn 2009:

  1. “Works and Days” by Jorge L. Contreras – an occasional survey of Pre‑Raphaelite and Victorian works recently bought, sold and displayed. Swinburne Among the Pre-Raphaelites
  2. “Friend or Foe? George du Maurier and the Pre-Raphaelites” by Stella‑Louise Halliwell
  3. “Book Review Desperate Romantics by Franny Moyle ” by Amelia Yeates
  4. “Pre-Raphaelite tendencies in the painting of The Hon. John Collier” by Katja Robinson
  5. “Exhibition Review Endless Forms: Charles Darwin, Natural Science and the Visual Arts ” by Nic Peeters

Summer 2009 cover

Vol. XVII, No. 2, Summer 2009:

  1. “Vernon Lushington The Embodiment of Pre-Raphaelitism” by David Taylor
  2. “Exhibition Review Rossetti’s China: the origins of ‘Blue Mania’ in the 1860s (includes appendix) ” by Anne Anderson
  3. Runner-up essay in the John Pickard Essay Prize by Philip Rowson.
  4. “Catastrophism” by Alexis Drahos.
  5. “James Collinson’s For Sale and To Let: The Vulnerable Woman” by Nancy Langham.
  6. John Pickard Essay Prize Announcement.

Spring 2009 cover

Vol. XVII, No. 1, Spring 2009:

  1. “Works and Days” by Jorge L. Contreras – an occasional survey of Pre‑Raphaelite and Victorian works recently bought, sold and displayed. Love and Ruins – Victorian Views of Pompeii
  2. “Thomas Buchanan Read: The First American Pre-Raphaelite?” by Chloe Nicholls.
  3. “Robert Braithwaite Martineau: Pre-Raphaelite Associate” by Amelia Yeates – the winner of the John Pickard Essay Prize for 2008.
  4. “The Pre-Raphaelites as Illustrators: Rossetti, Millais, Holman Hunt and the ‘Moxon Tennyson’” by Simon Cooke.
  5. “Pictures of Men at Work” by Margaret English.

Autumn 2008 cover, special edition, full colour

Vol. XVI, No. 2, Autumn 2008 – “The Pre‑Raphaelite Brotherhood”:

  1. “Neo-Ancients, Neo-Victorians, Neo-Pre-Raphaelites: Graham Ovenden and the Brotherhood of Ruralists” by Anne Anderson.
  2. “Dante Gabriel Rossetti by George Frederick Watts” by Jan Marsh.
  3. “William Michael Rossetti and the Italian Connection” by Angela Thirlwell.
  4. “Druids and Sphinxes: Hunt’s visual worlds of threats and delights” by Paul Barlow.
  5. ““Two to make a Brotherhood”: F.G. Stephens, art criticism and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood” by Patricia de Montfort.
  6. “A Consummate Illustrator – John Everett Millais” by Paul Goldman.
  7. “James Collinson, 1825-1881” by Helen Newman
  8. “Thomas Woolner” by Benedict Read

Spring 2008 cover

Vol. XVI, No. 1, Spring 2008:

  1. “Works and Days” by Jorge L. Contreras – an occasional survey of Pre‑Raphaelite and Victorian works recently bought, sold and displayed. William Morris’s Kelmscott Masterpieces
  2. “Works and Days” by Jorge L. Contreras – an occasional survey of Pre‑Raphaelite and Victorian works recently bought, sold and displayed.
  3. “Representations of Dante Gabriel Rossetti in the 1950s and 1960s” by Lisa Dallape Matson – this article discusses how Rossetti was portrayed as a character in three works of fiction, two novels and one made‑for‑television film which appeared in the 1950s and 1960s.
  4. The Winning Essay for the John Pickard Prize – “Hearing Millais” by Martin Dubois.
  5. “Elizabeth Siddall: Creator and Created” by Adele Uphaus – this article allows us to see how Lizzie was the product of a modern artistic vision and how she was “written” by her lover and his compatriots.

<< back to volumes XIII–XV | forward to volumes XIX–XXI >>

Home | The Society | The Review | News | Events | Membership / Donations | Links | Contacts | Help

Registered Charity 1095111